Friday, July 21, 2023

Lisinopril vs. Atenolol: What’s the Difference?

 Lisinopril and Atenolol are both medications used to treat high blood pressure. Lisinopril belongs to a class of drugs known as ACE inhibitors, while Atenolol is a beta-blocker

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 Both medications have similar uses, but they work differently in the body.

Side Effects

Like all medications, both Lisinopril and Atenolol can cause side effects. Common side effects of Lisinopril include a dry, tickly cough, dizziness, and headaches
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 Common side effects of Atenolol include feeling sleepy, tired, or dizzy, and cold fingers or toes
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 Both medications can cause more serious side effects, such as chest pain, heart attack, and irregular heartbeat, so it's important to talk to your doctor if you experience any unusual symptoms
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Dosage

The dosage of Lisinopril and Atenolol will depend on the individual and their condition. Lisinopril is typically taken once a day, with or without food, while Atenolol is usually taken once or twice a day, also with or without food
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Effectiveness

In a study comparing the antihypertensive effects of Lisinopril and Atenolol, Lisinopril produced a greater reduction in sitting systolic blood pressure than Atenolol
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 However, both medications were well-tolerated and suitable for first-line therapy in essential hypertension
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Precautions

Before taking either medication, it's important to tell your doctor if you have any allergies or medical conditions. Both medications can interact with other drugs, so it's important to let your doctor know about any other medications you are taking
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 Additionally, sudden cessation of either medication can cause chest pain, heart attack, or irregular heartbeat, so it's important to talk to your doctor before stopping either medication
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In conclusion, both Lisinopril and Atenolol are medications used to treat high blood pressure, but they work differently in the body. Both medications can cause side effects and interact with other drugs, so it's important to talk to your doctor before taking either medication.

Citations:
[1] https://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/lisinopril-oral-route/side-effects/drg-20069129
[2] https://www.nhs.uk/medicines/atenolol/side-effects-of-atenolol/
[3] https://www.webmd.com/drugs/2/drug-6873-9371/lisinopril-oral/lisinopril-oral/details
[4] https://www.webmd.com/drugs/2/drug-11035/atenolol-oral/details
[5] https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/1846057/
[6] https://www.nhs.uk/medicines/lisinopril/side-effects-of-lisinopril/
[7] https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/drugs/18066-atenolol-tablets
[8] https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/meds/a692051.html
[9] https://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/atenolol-oral-route/side-effects/drg-20071070?p=1
[10] https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/1653594/
[11] https://www.goodrx.com/lisinopril/lisinopril-side-effects
[12] https://www.drugs.com/sfx/atenolol-side-effects.html
[13] https://www.drugs.com/lisinopril.html
[14] https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/meds/a684031.html
[15] https://www.goodrx.com/compare/lisinopril-vs-atenolol
[16] https://www.drugs.com/sfx/lisinopril-side-effects.html
[17] https://www.healthline.com/health/drugs/atenolol-oral-tablet
[18] https://www.nhs.uk/medicines/lisinopril/
[19] https://www.nhs.uk/medicines/atenolol/
[20] https://www.healthcentral.com/article/comparison-atenolol-lisinopril
[21] https://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/lisinopril-oral-route/description/drg-20069129
[22] https://www.nhs.uk/medicines/atenolol/about-atenolol/
[23] https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0011393X05802723
[24] https://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/lisinopril-oral-route/side-effects/drg-20069129?p=1
[25] https://www.drugs.com/atenolol.html
[26] https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/bf03029754
[27] https://www.everydayhealth.com/drugs/lisinopril
[28] https://go.drugbank.com/drugs/DB00335
[29] https://academic.oup.com/ajh/article/11/10/1244/163252
[30] https://support.google.com/websearch?p=medical_conditions&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiuxYrSraGAAxUOg4QIHel_A-8Q79AEegQICBAJ
[31] https://diabetesjournals.org/diabetes/article/46/7/1182/9403/Long-Term-Effect-of-Lisinopril-and-Atenolol-on

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