Saturday, July 22, 2023

Types of Exercise Recommended for People with Diabetes

 Exercise is important for everyone, but it is especially important for people with diabetes. Regular exercise can help control weight, lower blood pressure, lower harmful LDL cholesterol and triglycerides, raise healthy HDL cholesterol, strengthen muscles and bones, reduce anxiety, and improve your general well-being

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 In addition to these benefits, exercise can also lower blood glucose levels and boost your body's sensitivity to insulin, countering insulin resistance
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There are two main types of exercise that are recommended for people with diabetes: aerobic exercise and resistance training.

Aerobic Exercise

Aerobic exercise, also known as cardio, is any activity that gets your heart rate up and makes you breathe harder. Examples include walking, running, cycling, swimming, and dancing
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 Aerobic exercise can lower blood glucose levels, improve insulin sensitivity, reduce body fat, help build and tone muscles, lower the risk for heart disease, improve circulation, preserve bone mass, reduce stress, and enhance quality of life
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The American Diabetes Association recommends that people with diabetes perform aerobic exercise regularly. Aerobic activity bouts should ideally last at least 10 minutes, with the goal of approximately 30 minutes per day or more, most days of the week for adults with type 2 diabetes
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 Children and adolescents with type 1 or type 2 diabetes should engage in 60 minutes per day or more of moderate or vigorous intensity aerobic activity, with vigorous, muscle-strengthening, and bone-strengthening activities included at least 3 days per week
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Resistance Training

Resistance training, also known as strength training or weightlifting, involves using weights or resistance bands to build and strengthen muscles. Resistance training can improve glucose regulation, increase muscle mass, and improve bone density
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The American Diabetes Association recommends that adults with diabetes engage in 2-3 sessions per week of resistance exercise on nonconsecutive days
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It is important to note that exercise can sometimes raise blood glucose levels, especially during high-intensity exercise or resistance training. However, regular exercise can still help lower blood glucose levels overall
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 It is important to monitor blood glucose levels before, during, and after exercise to see how the exercise affects them
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Remember to talk with your healthcare team before starting a new physical activity routine, especially if you have other health problems. Your healthcare team will tell you a target range for your blood glucose level and suggest how you can be active safely
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In summary, both aerobic exercise and resistance training are recommended for people with diabetes. Aerobic exercise can lower blood glucose levels, improve insulin sensitivity, reduce body fat, and lower the risk for heart disease. Resistance training can improve glucose regulation, increase muscle mass, and improve bone density. Remember to monitor your blood glucose levels and talk with your healthcare team before starting a new exercise routine.

Citations:
[1] https://diatribe.org/which-type-exercise-best-managing-diabetes-aerobic-exercise-or-weightlifting
[2] https://www.goodrx.com/conditions/diabetes/best-exercise-for-diabetes-blood-sugar-management-weight-loss
[3] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3881442/
[4] https://diabetes.org/healthy-living/fitness/getting-started-safely/exercising-diabetes-complications
[5] https://diabetesjournals.org/care/article/39/11/2065/37249/Physical-Activity-Exercise-and-Diabetes-A-Position
[6] https://www.webmd.com/diabetes/ss/slideshow-exercises-diabetes
[7] https://www.eatingwell.com/article/8035177/best-strength-training-exercises-for-diabetes/
[8] https://www.uptodate.com/contents/exercise-and-medical-care-for-people-with-type-2-diabetes-beyond-the-basics
[9] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2992225/
[10] https://www.healthline.com/health/type-2-diabetes/top-exercises
[11] https://sportsmedicine-open.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s40798-021-00321-x
[12] https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/in-depth/diabetes-and-exercise/art-20045697
[13] https://health.clevelandclinic.org/5-best-exercises-for-people-with-diabetes/
[14] https://www.everydayhealth.com/type-2-diabetes/living-with/weight-lifting-get-strong/
[15] https://www.uclahealth.org/medical-services/endocrinology/diabetes/type-1-diabetes/exercise-guidelines
[16] https://www.everydayhealth.com/type-2-diabetes/living-with/great-exercises-for-people-with-diabetes/
[17] https://www.uclahealth.org/news/benefits-of-resistance-training-for-people-with-prediabetes
[18] https://www.webmd.com/diabetes/exercise-guidelines
[19] https://www.everydayhealth.com/type-2-diabetes/great-low-impact-exercises-diabetes/
[20] https://www.webmd.com/diabetes/strength-training-diabetes
[21] https://www.diabetes.co.uk/exercise-for-diabetics.html
[22] https://diabetes.org/healthy-living/fitness/anaerobic-exercise-diabetes
[23] https://www.diabetes.ca/managing-my-diabetes/tools---resources/resistance-exercise-guidelines
[24] https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/managing/active.html
[25] https://drc.bmj.com/content/10/2/e002595

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