Thursday, July 13, 2023

What is Thrombosis?What are the symptoms?

 Thrombosis is the formation of a blood clot (thrombus) inside one of your blood vessels or a chamber of your heart. Clots can block blood flow in your blood vessels or break free and travel elsewhere in your body. If a clot gets stuck in a critical location like your lungs or brain, it can disrupt blood flow to that organ and result in a life-threatening emergency

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Symptoms

Symptoms of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the leg are pain, swelling, and tenderness in one of your legs (usually your calf or thigh), a heavy ache in the affected area, warm skin in the area of the clot, and red skin, particularly at the back of your leg below the knee. Sometimes there may be no symptoms of DVT
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 Symptoms of phlebitis include pain, swelling, redness, and warmth around the affected area. The affected vein can swell, leading to palpable, hard cords along the vein
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Phlebitis

Phlebitis is inflammation of a vein, and thrombophlebitis is due to one or more blood clots in a vein that cause inflammation. Thrombophlebitis usually occurs in leg veins, but it may occur in an arm or other parts of the body. The thrombus in the vein causes pain and irritation and may block blood flow in the veins. Superficial phlebitis usually develops after you’ve had a mild trauma to one of your veins, such as having an IV line. It typically subsides quickly and doesn’t cause any serious health problems. In deep vein thrombosis, the blood clot in the deep vein can break loose and travel through your bloodstream to your lungs. This can cause a pulmonary embolism, a dangerous blockage that prevents blood from reaching your lungs
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Venous Thromboembolism

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a medical condition that occurs when a blood clot forms in a deep vein. These clots usually develop in the lower leg, thigh, or pelvis, but they can also occur in the arm. DVT can cause serious illness, disability, and in some cases, death. DVT and pulmonary embolism together are known as venous thromboembolism (VTE) 
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Causes and Risk Factors

Venous thrombosis may be caused by disease or injury to the leg veins, not being able to move around (immobility) for any reason, a broken bone (fracture), certain medicines, obesity, inherited disorders, or a greater likelihood of having a certain disorder based on your genes, autoimmune disorders that make it more likely your blood will clot, and medicines that increase your risk of clotting (such as certain birth control medicines). Arterial thrombosis may be caused by a hardening of the arteries, called arteriosclerosis. This happens when fatty or calcium deposits cause artery walls to thicken and harden
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Diagnosis

If you think you have DVT, it's important to get medical help as soon as possible. A doctor will perform a physical exam and may order an ultrasound, blood test, or venography to confirm the diagnosis
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 Diagnosis of thrombosis is based on the patient's history, physical examination, and imaging studies. Imaging studies include ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and venography
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Treatment

Treatment for thrombosis depends on the location and severity of the clot. Treatment options include anticoagulant medications, thrombolytic therapy, and surgery. Anticoagulant medications, such as heparin and warfarin, help prevent blood clots from forming and growing. Thrombolytic therapy involves the use of drugs to dissolve blood clots. Surgery may be necessary in some cases to remove the clot
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 Treatment for phlebitis may include compression stockings, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and warm compresses. If your evaluation shows superficial phlebitis and you are otherwise healthy, you may not need any treatment
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Possible Long-Term Consequences of Thrombosis

Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) is a condition that can develop after a blood clot in a deep vein (DVT). The blood clot damages the valve in your leg vein, and people with a history of DVT face a higher risk of developing CVI. CVI can lead to severe hemorrhage, and chronic venous ulcers are painful and debilitating. Even with treatment, recurrences are common if venous hypertension persists. Nearly 60% develop phlebitis which often progresses to deep vein thrombosis in more than 50% of patients
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