Friday, December 22, 2023

The Jewish people will never cease to exist because God loves his chosen people. Why did God allow people to persecute them for centuries? What kind of God is that?

 The question of why God would allow the Jewish people, or any group, to suffer persecution is a profound and complex one that touches on the nature of God, the problem of evil, and the concept of free will. This is known as theodicy, the defense of God's goodness and omnipotence in view of the existence of evil.

The search results provide various perspectives on this issue:
  1. Historical Persecution: The history of Jewish persecution is long and includes periods such as the Christian persecution of Jews over the centuries, where Jews were often preyed upon by the Christian majority
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     This persecution has been influenced by various factors, including religious, economic, and sociopolitical dynamics.
  2. God in Judaism: In Judaism, God is traditionally viewed as the deliverer of the Israelites from slavery in Egypt and the giver of the Law of Moses at Mount Sinai
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     The conception of God in Judaism is complex and multifaceted, with different interpretations ranging from a personal God to an abstract force within the universe
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  3. Theodicy in Jewish Tradition: Jewish tradition presents a variety of theodicies, some of which reject the notion that all suffering is punishment for sin, while others suggest that suffering can be a form of divine retribution or a test of faith
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     The Holocaust, in particular, has challenged Jewish theodicy and led to various responses, including the idea that God is "hiding" or that human free will is responsible for evil
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  4. Free Will and Suffering: One explanation for why God allows suffering is the concept of free will. According to this view, God created humans with the ability to choose between good and evil, and the misuse of this free will leads to suffering
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     This perspective suggests that God does not cause suffering but allows it as part of the moral autonomy granted to humans.
  5. Divine Justice and the Future: Some Jewish thinkers hold that God's justice will ultimately prevail, and those who have persecuted the Jewish people will face divine judgment
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     This view often includes the belief in a messianic future where God will rectify the wrongs of the past.
  6. God's Relationship with the Jewish People: Despite the history of suffering, many Jewish thinkers maintain that God loves the Jewish people and has a special relationship with them
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     This belief is intertwined with the idea that the Jewish people have a unique role in the divine plan.
In summary, the question of why God allows persecution is addressed in various ways within Jewish thought, with no single answer. The perspectives range from emphasizing human free will and its consequences to trusting in a future divine justice that will make sense of past sufferings. It is important to note that these are theological interpretations and beliefs, and they do not provide empirical explanations for historical events.

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